What are Little Free Libraries?

You’ve probably seen those little boxes full of books placed throughout the neighborhood. Little Free Library is a nonprofit organization based in Hudson, Wisconsin. Essentially, Little Free Library is a free book-sharing box where anyone can leave unwanted or used books, and others searching for a good read can sift through the box and select the book of their choice. Little Free Library believes, “all people are empowered when the opportunity to discover a personally relevant book to read is not limited by time, space or privilege.”

Where is my local Little Free Library located?

There are currently four Little Free Libraries located within our area, according to the world map, including one “Alice in Wonderland” themed library located on Hart Street between Bushwick Avenue and Broadway, a second at 426 Irving Ave. on the opposite side of Bushwick High School, a third located right outside of Cooper Park where Olive Street and Orient Street meet, and a fourth on Montrose Avenue between Graham and Manhattan Avenues, just outside of Swans Nest Yoga.

Pook’s Book Nook, located outside of Cooper Park.
Pook’s Book Nook is well stocked (Image: Pook’s Book Nook)

Who is in charge of each Little Free Library?

Registered libraries have primary caretakers called “Little Free Library stewards.” These are often the people who set up the libraries. Stewards are responsible for maintaining Little Free Libraries and ensuring that they are always stocked.

How can I start my own Little Free Library?

Anyone can start a Little Free Library. You can start by building your own library and registering it. Or, you can buy a kit, which come pre-registered. Once you have a registered library in your front yard or stoop, you can add it to the world map, which includes hundreds of Little Free Libraries around the world. For some extra tips, check out this short video.


Featured image: Kylie Becker

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