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Vice Came to Bushwick to Find "Techno-Collagist Who Turns Lasers and Human Limbs Into Instruments" [VIDEO]

Whoa, holy crap- we know new music is spreading through Bushwick like bedbugs on the MTA (too soon?), but leave it to VICE's music subsidiary Noisey's Motherboard to expose the world to some of the coolest music making we've seen in Bushwick! On a tour with host (and local musician from Friends, Blood Orange) Samantha Urbani, we met "techo-collagist" and interactive sound artist Adriano Clemente (and his Bushwick neighbors, one of whom is a professional conga player)

Whoa, holy crap- we know new music is spreading through Bushwick like bedbugs on the MTA (too soon?), but leave it to VICE's music subsidiary Noisey's Motherboard to expose the world to some of the coolest music making we've seen in Bushwick! On a tour with host (and local musician from Friends, Blood Orange) Samantha Urbani, we met "techo-collagist" and interactive sound artist Adriano Clemente (and his Bushwick neighbors, one of whom is a professional conga player). We profiled Adriano already back in 2012 but it's great to see what the dude has been up to lately.

Inside his typically dingy Bushwick basement apartment and concrete backyard (right off of Wyckoff and Harman), forward-thinking musician, producer, and sound-collagist Adriano Clemente has transformed the space into an interactive musical lab with all sorts of experimental tools and instruments. His incredible style and tech-woven vision comes from a mesh of his background in academia  (he studied psychology in Italy) with his musical inclinations and his skills as a "hacker."  The result are a few standout instruments, including a motion-tracking bio-feedback sensor which Urbani tried on to transform her arm in his words "into a complete instrument", in her words "turn[ing] the sound into...physical matter." Pretty amazing! Check out the video below:

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