Bushwick Daily Logo Menu sandwich Loupe Views Comments Comments Location Refresh Star Lock Lock Button Edit Button Socials: Facebook Socials: Twitter Socials: Instagram Socials: Youtube Socials: RSS Socials: E-mail Author Next page Previous page Comment rating up Comment rating down Comment parent Close Community icon Desktop site Subscribe Settings Message Remove Upload s

Artist FlashCards: Julian Lorber's "Architecture of Pollution"

Each week Bushwick Daily brings you a new Artist FlashCard introducing an amazing artist living/working/showing in Bushwick who you need to know

Each week Bushwick Daily brings you a new Artist FlashCard introducing an amazing artist living/working/showing in Bushwick who you need to know. Featuring both new and old faces, our goal is to encourage the growth of art scene and to appreciate wonderful talent in our hood! If you know of an artist you would like to suggest for Artist FlashCards, please fill out our online form.

Who: Julian Lorber

Where: Studio on Ingraham Street

What: Julian's paintings and sculpture explore the effect the "architecture of pollution," abstracting the concept through his working process that mimics the build up of paint, industrial grime and urban decay over time.

A Foregone Conclusion

Where You've Seen His Work: Julian shows at et al Projects in the 56 Bogart Building and with Mindy Solomon Gallery  in Miami. You can catch his work next week at Volta NY, a curated fair devoted to showcasing individual artists at each booth, as well as at an upcoming show at et al Projects this spring in their new space (stay tuned!)

Delta < > Dirt

Why We're Into It: There is a sexy, streamlined aesthetic that exists in Julian's work. His body of work demonstrates the understanding and intuition with the materials he uses, creating a seemingly effortless finished product.  Like a well-crafted car, we can marvel at the result yet truly wonder how it was constructed.  Just as a warehouse building in Bushwick wears its graffiti-marked and layers of city detritus as if it had been created that way, Julian's pieces exist in their entirety through these layers of paint. Through this build up, we are able to appreciate the abstract form and the depth that by the shadows created by this technique and the chosen color palette. In Water Table  for example, I can't help but see the atmospheric layers created by the city's congestion at sunset represented in the work.  Even if inspired by this decay, Julian finds the aesthetic joy in these inspirations; even if they are man made they become an integral part of these stunning pieces.

Comments

Subscribe
Comments is loading
Login in order to comment